UConn star becoming leader of field hockey pack

In October, Germans come out to play. But instead of a strong pitcher of beer, Charlotte Veitner has a strong game on the pitch — the field hockey pitch, that is. Charlotte Veitner, a sophomore forward on the University of Connecticut’s field hockey team, has brought serious talent and skill from her hometown of Dusseldorf, Germany. After her breakout freshman year , in which she not only was named 2014 Big East Rookie of the Year, but also 2014 All-Big East Second Team and 2014 NFHCA All-Mideast Region First Team, Veitner finished her inaugural season by helping the Huskies bring home their second consecutive NCAA Field Hockey Championship. This season she’s been named the Big East Offensive Player of the Week five times in six weeks, and has recorded four hat tricks. She tops the national Division I leaders in points per game (4.82), and ranks second in goals per game (2.09), both of which top the Big East Conference. Only halfway through the field hockey season, Veitner has already bested her own career highs, leading the conference with 23 goals and 53 points. Recruited by more than two dozen schools, Veitner’s skills seem as if they could have flourished anywhere. But the Dusseldorf native disagrees. “When I was on the [German U19] national team, I was not really a big impact player,” Veitner said. “At home, the style of game is a little different.” When pressed about her stellar performances and her swiftly growing Big East accolades, Veitner is quick to dole out praise and honor the hard work of her teammates. “I know that I do get a lot of credit, and it obviously feels good to get recognized for what I’m doing because I put in a lot of work,” said Veitner. “But it’s not really me. I’m not on the pitch by myself. People see the goals, but they don’t see the hard work that the midfielders are putting in. We have amazing people in the midfield that take away every ball from the opponent, and they set it up for me. I don’t have to do much with it.” Not only has her playing time in the US taught her a lot about the game (mental, physical, and emotional), but it’s given her a home away from home. “Here, your team players become your best friends and your family at the same time,” Veitner said. She may be 4,000 miles from her hometown in Germany, but Veitner’s found a family in the Husky pack of the UConn.

UConn star becoming leader of field hockey pack

In October, Germans come out to play. But instead of a strong pitcher of beer, Charlotte Veitner has a strong game on the pitch — the field hockey pitch, that is.

Charlotte Veitner, a sophomore forward on the University of Connecticut’s field hockey team, has brought serious talent and skill from her hometown of Dusseldorf, Germany.

After her breakout freshman year , in which she not only was named 2014 Big East Rookie of the Year, but also 2014 All-Big East Second Team and 2014 NFHCA All-Mideast Region First Team, Veitner finished her inaugural season by helping the Huskies bring home their second consecutive NCAA Field Hockey Championship.

This season she’s been named the Big East Offensive Player of the Week five times in six weeks, and has recorded four hat tricks. She tops the national Division I leaders in points per game (4.82), and ranks second in goals per game (2.09), both of which top the Big East Conference.

Only halfway through the field hockey season, Veitner has already bested her own career highs, leading the conference with 23 goals and 53 points.

Recruited by more than two dozen schools, Veitner’s skills seem as if they could have flourished anywhere. But the Dusseldorf native disagrees.

“When I was on the [German U19] national team, I was not really a big impact player,” Veitner said. “At home, the style of game is a little different.”

When pressed about her stellar performances and her swiftly growing Big East accolades, Veitner is quick to dole out praise and honor the hard work of her teammates.

“I know that I do get a lot of credit, and it obviously feels good to get recognized for what I’m doing because I put in a lot of work,” said Veitner. “But it’s not really me. I’m not on the pitch by myself. People see the goals, but they don’t see the hard work that the midfielders are putting in. We have amazing people in the midfield that take away every ball from the opponent, and they set it up for me. I don’t have to do much with it.”

Not only has her playing time in the US taught her a lot about the game (mental, physical, and emotional), but it’s given her a home away from home.

“Here, your team players become your best friends and your family at the same time,” Veitner said.

She may be 4,000 miles from her hometown in Germany, but Veitner’s found a family in the Husky pack of the UConn.

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